It's All About the Journey

Today is your future. Live in the moment!


Fanning My Flame

Surrounded by the comforts of my ancestors, words from the philosophies of Emerson and Thoreau, I am reminded of who I am and where my soul thrives. All of the outside world fades, for just this brief moment of time, and I fan the flame called my soul, into a roaring fire that drives me forward into 2019 and shows me that happiness is right here, inside of me.

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Kitten Tales

She touches my calf gently.  “Don’t forget…”

I won’t.  As I high power jump my morning with grinding my coffee beans and filling the pot, she reminds me, she is hungry….

We left  these two, we call “our kids,” to do some Thanksgiving travel.  Unforgotten, they were served by the neighbor, but did not become cat-like and ignore us once we arrived back home late Saturday night.  Peppa, the white kittycat (yes, they are still kittens until their birthday March 15), snuggled between us, placing her paw protectively on my cheek (have to laugh at that one).  Ginger, just HAD to be OUT, so we had to open the bathroom window for just a little while, as this is their exit/entrance routine.

Quite honestly, I never thought I’d own another pet.  As lovely as they can be, and for the love they bestow upon us, they do come with a monetary obligation.  As well they come with an emotional one.  My father, who is 87, has had to choose to not have another pet.  Last Christmas he had to put his cat down.  He sleeps with her picture beneath his pillow and kisses it.  We have spoken to him about Peppa, the cat who loves to jump into our arms and hug.  She would do him well, but he feels he cannot meet the obligation.  She will meet his need for a love connection (and yes, I can do this.  I love my cat, but I love my father and am willing to share that love).

I guess, what I am saying, is don’t snub the cat.  Don’t snub the dog.  They are created and just as useful in their own way, to this world.  Even my barn cats have their need for love and compassion, even though they shrink to the idea that I am gentle.  (More on them another writing.)


This Old House, cont’d

Remember this old house? Still working on it.

I cannot say “we,” but he has been working onward with this house. Walls have been stripped to the board, windows removed, flooring taken up. Electrical wiring (mostly) removed. Exterior siding and tin roof removed.

This has been an experience and a long walk down memory lane for this man. Perhaps just short of a spiritual experience as he tears down this childhood home, to prepare for our future.

I’d love to take this into the woods and become Thoreau. Wouldn’t you?


2018 The Year Ahead

What is our world, if we have not the encouraging word?

Act singly, and what you have already done singly will justify you now. The force of character is cumulative. –Ralph Waldo Emerson

Step out. Be true to yourself. Do not hurt others, do good to all. Then peace will come.


Setting Pace with Nature

A friend pointed out to me an article in The Conservationist, a circular that encompasses New York State wildlife.  An Emerson fan, she thought of me when the author of an article spoke of Emerson.  Naturally drawn to Emerson, I looked up the article, Chomping at Nature’s Bit by Eli Knapp.  There it was.  “Adapt the pace of nature, her secret is patience.”  

I can agree with this concept.  Nature is very patient.  She wait for us to mess up, then she calmly takes over.  Paved roads break up while she takes over.  Brush grows up in fields that the farmer has kept plowed, our neglect becomes her tapestry.

I have forbidden the groundhog hunt here on our civilized patch.  Build more garden, share it, I say (I’m not the one building the garden, easy for me to say).  Then again, if you need to remove them, do not ever let me know.  I cannot bear the thought.  I’m definitely a human heart here, while they live on instinct, and the reality of the world is that, if we want to keep our crops for harvest, we need to limit their “help” in harvesting!

Back to the subject at hand, Emerson and Nature.  I encourage you to read his essay.  Absorb it.  Be patient with it.

In patience, I seek a word from this essay to inspire you, my readers, to seek.  Difficult at the least, I send you this:  Nature is loved by what is best in us.  It is loved as the city of God.  I dare not say more, at least, not now.  Emerson is difficult in that we cannot take mere quotes and have them realized in and of themselves, they must be coupled with the rest of the essay.  The one thing I have learned from Emerson can bring my defeat as his follower:  Lay this volume down.   You had better never see my essays than to be warped by their attraction out of your own orbit and be made my satellite.  Then let me lay this volume down, and step outdoors where my dog absorbs nature, she is my lesson.  As are the birds, the groundhog, and the breeze which blows against my face.

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Life is an Emoji

Skipping through social media, as best as I could this morning, waiting for the ads to load so I could scroll, I stumbled across the word “emoji,” and have thought about it some.  As I scroll, I hit these little icons of like, love, thankful, wow.  I rarely do any of the others, I just keep scrolling.  Sometimes I remember to delete the ads I’ve seen way too much, for fear of saying something spiteful, we shouldn’t dwell in a negative world.

Then my break comes.  Gracie, the black lab.  She gets up in the morning, and while I am hovering over the laptop and a cuppa joe, she wants her hugs.  “You are the best puppy ever!” I state, and she shudders and chatters her teeth, her happy sign.  I wish I had an emoji for that.  Wait.  No I don’t.  She is alive and affectionate.  We step outside, where her “babies” wait for her (a stuffed bone, and a stuffed skunk, she takes her pick).  The morning birds announce the morning, despite the dark rain clouds that keep the sun from shining.

And the birds, we keep the bird feeders full, despite instruction that they need to now find food on their own.  We are enjoying them way too much.  We even saw Baltimore orioles the other day!

We found her crying in the box of sawdust.  The stray kitten that wandered from mama’s nest, somewhere in that haymow.  She cried and cried.  Barn kittens, we leave them for mama to find.  (She did find her!)

All signs of life, a full life, and in the circle of life.  Life in signs:  the apple blossoms, the dogwood trees, the daffodils and tulips as they awaken, and now, the lilacs.  (As soon as the sweet honeysuckle blooms, I am reminded that heaven exists.)

Stop and listen.  Just for a moment.  The world goes on.  It’s a better place.